Some individuals in Georgia involved in relationships may feel they have problems controlling their anger or healthily expressing their emotions. This may leave them open to potentially physically striking a significant other.

It is a good idea to understand how domestic violence happens, as the National Domestic Violence Hotline did. Comprehending the root cause can go a long way in a person avoiding a charge of domestic violence and getting help.

Power and control

Two of the biggest reasons for the occurrence of domestic violence are power and control. Abusers may feel entitled to more liberties than they rightfully have to a partner, and the feeling of having power and control over a person can become intoxicating.

Childhood environment

People who grew up in environments with domestic violence may come to normalize the behavior, thinking nothing of resorting to hitting a partner. A person’s friends could also engage in hitting and/or verbally belittling a significant other, which may also normalize abusive behavior.

Fewer resources

As pointed out by Verywell Mind, someone who engages in domestic violence and wants to get help for the behavior may not have many viable options for doing so. Jail and prison time are often only stop-gaps, seeing as funds are usually not used for non-court-ordered treatment. When the person is behind bars, the only reason the violence stops is that the abuser cannot physically lay hands on her or his significant other. Being in jail or prison does not adequately address the root cause of domestic violence, only the results.

Understanding and breaking the cycle of abuse also helps. Additionally, understanding and addressing the reasons for relationship conflict can aid in curbing domestic violence.